Adventures All Aboard.


The Mysterious Benedict Society by Trenton Lee Stewart
★★★★★
Thought it seemed so long ago, he well remembered their conversation about the Chess problem. The White Knight had made a move, changed his mind, and started over. 
"And do you believe this was a good move?" Mr. Benedict had asked. 
"No, sir," Reynie had answered.
"Why, then do you think he made it?"
And Reynie had replied, “Perhaps because he doubted himself.”
I can’t really put all of my feeling into words. This is book is just.. wow. I wasn’t originally planning to buy this when I went to the bookstore. I was planning on buying The Book Thief instead. But then this really caught my attention. It was on the shelf right above the one where The Book Thief was sitting on. So I grabbed it and read the Ad Blurb. The Blurb said that you could test your intelligence while the characters did. And right at that moment, my mind went from one path, to two. One led to “The Book Thief” and the other led to “The Mysterious Benedict Society.” What caught my attention was that, there was Morse code under the Ad Blurb. So due to my curiosity, I just had to find out why that was. So I bought the book, went home, and started reading it. One word.. Bewitched.
When I started reading, I couldn’t put it down. The book and the events was glued to your mind. And after every event, you’ll be dying to find out what the characters will do next. And even at the end of the book, you’ll still get more of that flabbergasting feeling than you did in previous events. It will reveal things that you never really thought of. As if making the unimportant, important. So if you plan on buying this, expect the unexpected. 
The main characters are 12 below. So since my age wasn’t that far from theirs, I was really able to feel like I was part of the adventure. Some of them would really make your blood boil, and then later you’ll find yourself crying over them. Like you’re so proud of them.
This book could also help you get more intelligent. You wouldn’t need those tests you usually take online. Through the midst of reading, you’ll feel yourself getting smarter and smarter. The book isn’t something you could cheat with, it would just tell you what to do when you’re solving a very hard problem. 
To prove it, the author wrote a letter at the end of the book that made it look like  it was written by one of the characters. At first, I didn’t get it. But then I figured, I should do what Reynie and his friends did to solve it. And then Bam! The answer was “in my grasp” all along. 
A very interesting and amazing read! If you’re looking for mystery books that contain less romance, then this I recommend. :D
Happy Reading! 
Janelle xx

The Mysterious Benedict Society by Trenton Lee Stewart

Thought it seemed so long ago, he well remembered their conversation about the Chess problem. The White Knight had made a move, changed his mind, and started over. 

"And do you believe this was a good move?" Mr. Benedict had asked. 

"No, sir," Reynie had answered.

"Why, then do you think he made it?"

And Reynie had replied, “Perhaps because he doubted himself.”

I can’t really put all of my feeling into words. This is book is just.. wow. I wasn’t originally planning to buy this when I went to the bookstore. I was planning on buying The Book Thief instead. But then this really caught my attention. It was on the shelf right above the one where The Book Thief was sitting on. So I grabbed it and read the Ad Blurb. The Blurb said that you could test your intelligence while the characters did. And right at that moment, my mind went from one path, to two. One led to “The Book Thief” and the other led to “The Mysterious Benedict Society.” What caught my attention was that, there was Morse code under the Ad Blurb. So due to my curiosity, I just had to find out why that was. So I bought the book, went home, and started reading it. One word.. Bewitched.

When I started reading, I couldn’t put it down. The book and the events was glued to your mind. And after every event, you’ll be dying to find out what the characters will do next. And even at the end of the book, you’ll still get more of that flabbergasting feeling than you did in previous events. It will reveal things that you never really thought of. As if making the unimportant, important. So if you plan on buying this, expect the unexpected. 

The main characters are 12 below. So since my age wasn’t that far from theirs, I was really able to feel like I was part of the adventure. Some of them would really make your blood boil, and then later you’ll find yourself crying over them. Like you’re so proud of them.

This book could also help you get more intelligent. You wouldn’t need those tests you usually take online. Through the midst of reading, you’ll feel yourself getting smarter and smarter. The book isn’t something you could cheat with, it would just tell you what to do when you’re solving a very hard problem. 

To prove it, the author wrote a letter at the end of the book that made it look like  it was written by one of the characters. At first, I didn’t get it. But then I figured, I should do what Reynie and his friends did to solve it. And then Bam! The answer was “in my grasp” all along. 

A very interesting and amazing read! If you’re looking for mystery books that contain less romance, then this I recommend. :D

Happy Reading! 

Janelle xx

Books I (Janelle) recently bought. :D
The mysterious Benedict Society by Trenton Lee Stewart
Plot:
- “ARE YOU A GIFTED CHILD LOOKING FOR SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES?” Dozens of children respond to this peculiar ad in the newspaper and are then put through a series of mind-bending tests, which readers take along with them. Only four children-two boys and two girls-succeed. Their challenge: to go on a secret mission that only the most intelligent and inventive children could complete. To accomplish it they will have to go undercover at the Learning Institute for the Very Enlightened, where the only rule is that there are no rules. But what they’ll find in the hidden underground tunnels of the school is more than your average school supplies. So, if you’re gifted, creative, or happen to know Morse Code, they could probably use your help. 
The Silver Needle Murder by Laura Childs
Plot: 
- The Charleston Film Festival has brought Theodosia Browning and the staff of the Indigo Tea Shop a busy week of catering jobs. First up is the opening night gala at the historic Belvedere Theatre. Tinseltown and local luminaries seem to be mingling happily in the glamorously renovated lobby, but Theo notices that the atmosphere backstage is tense. Then famous director Jordan Cole is shot on his way to the podium, and the entire audience witnesses his death silhouetted across the scrim. Never has a festival started off with this big a bang.
Fall of Frost by Brian Hall
Plot: - In his most recent novel, I Should Be Extremely Happy in Your Company, Brian Hall won acclaim for the way he used the intimate, revelatory voice of fiction to capture the half- hidden personal stories of the Lewis and Clark expedition. In his new novel Hall turns to the life of Robert Frost, arguably America’s most well-known poet. Frost, as both man and artist, was toughened by a hard life. His own father died when Frost was eleven; his only sibling, a sister, had to be institutionalized; of his five children, one died before the age of four, one committed suicide, one went insane, and one died in childbirth. 
Told in short chapters, each of which presents an emblematic incident with intensity and immediacy, Hall’s novel deftly weaves together the earlier parts of Frost’s life with his final year, 1962, when, at age eighty- eight, and under the looming threat of the Cuban Missile Crisis, he made a visit to Russia and met with Khrushchev. As Hall shows, Frost determined early on that he would not succumb to the tragedies life threw at him. The deaths of his children were forms of his own death from which he resurrected himself through poetry—for him, the preeminent symbol of man’s form-giving power. A searing, exquisitely constructed portrait of one man’s rages, guilt, paranoia, and sheer, defiant persistence, as well as an exploration of why good people suffer unjustly and how art is born from that unanswerable question, Fall of Frost is a magnificent work that further confirms Hall’s status as one of the most talented novelists at work today.
Memorial by Bruce Wagner
Plot:
- Joan Herlihy is a semi-successful architect grasping at the illustrious commission that will catapult her to international renown, glossy de cor magazines, and the luxe condo designs of Meier, Koolhaas, and Hadid: the incestuous cult of contemporary Starchitects. Unexpectedly, she finds her Venice Beach firm on the short list for a coveted private memorial — a Napa billionaire’s vanity tribute to relatives killed in the Christmas tsunami — with life-changing consequences. Her brother Chester clings to a failing career as a location scout before suffering an accidental injury resulting from an outrageous prank; the tragicomic repercussions lead him through a maze of addiction, delusion, paranoia — and ultimately, transcendence.
Virtually abandoned by her family, the indomitable Marjorie Herlihy — mother, widow, and dreamer — falls prey to a confidence scheme dizzying in its sadism and complexity. And unbeknownst to Marj and her children, the father who disappeared decades ago is alive and well nearby, recently in the local news for reasons that will prove to be both his redemption and his undoing. Spiraling toward catastrophe, separate lives collide as family members make a valiant attempt to reunite and create an enduring legacy. To rewrite a ruined American dream.

Books I (Janelle) recently bought. :D

  • The mysterious Benedict Society by Trenton Lee Stewart

Plot:

- “ARE YOU A GIFTED CHILD LOOKING FOR SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES?” Dozens of children respond to this peculiar ad in the newspaper and are then put through a series of mind-bending tests, which readers take along with them. Only four children-two boys and two girls-succeed. Their challenge: to go on a secret mission that only the most intelligent and inventive children could complete. To accomplish it they will have to go undercover at the Learning Institute for the Very Enlightened, where the only rule is that there are no rules. But what they’ll find in the hidden underground tunnels of the school is more than your average school supplies. So, if you’re gifted, creative, or happen to know Morse Code, they could probably use your help. 

  • The Silver Needle Murder by Laura Childs

Plot: 

The Charleston Film Festival has brought Theodosia Browning and the staff of the Indigo Tea Shop a busy week of catering jobs. First up is the opening night gala at the historic Belvedere Theatre. Tinseltown and local luminaries seem to be mingling happily in the glamorously renovated lobby, but Theo notices that the atmosphere backstage is tense. Then famous director Jordan Cole is shot on his way to the podium, and the entire audience witnesses his death silhouetted across the scrim. Never has a festival started off with this big a bang.

  • Fall of Frost by Brian Hall

Plot: 
In his most recent novel, I Should Be Extremely Happy in Your Company, Brian Hall won acclaim for the way he used the intimate, revelatory voice of fiction to capture the half- hidden personal stories of the Lewis and Clark expedition. In his new novel Hall turns to the life of Robert Frost, arguably America’s most well-known poet. Frost, as both man and artist, was toughened by a hard life. His own father died when Frost was eleven; his only sibling, a sister, had to be institutionalized; of his five children, one died before the age of four, one committed suicide, one went insane, and one died in childbirth. 


Told in short chapters, each of which presents an emblematic incident with intensity and immediacy, Hall’s novel deftly weaves together the earlier parts of Frost’s life with his final year, 1962, when, at age eighty- eight, and under the looming threat of the Cuban Missile Crisis, he made a visit to Russia and met with Khrushchev. 

As Hall shows, Frost determined early on that he would not succumb to the tragedies life threw at him. The deaths of his children were forms of his own death from which he resurrected himself through poetry—for him, the preeminent symbol of man’s form-giving power. 

A searing, exquisitely constructed portrait of one man’s rages, guilt, paranoia, and sheer, defiant persistence, as well as an exploration of why good people suffer unjustly and how art is born from that unanswerable question, Fall of Frost is a magnificent work that further confirms Hall’s status as one of the most talented novelists at work today.

  • Memorial by Bruce Wagner

Plot:

Joan Herlihy is a semi-successful architect grasping at the illustrious commission that will catapult her to international renown, glossy de cor magazines, and the luxe condo designs of Meier, Koolhaas, and Hadid: the incestuous cult of contemporary Starchitects. Unexpectedly, she finds her Venice Beach firm on the short list for a coveted private memorial — a Napa billionaire’s vanity tribute to relatives killed in the Christmas tsunami — with life-changing consequences. Her brother Chester clings to a failing career as a location scout before suffering an accidental injury resulting from an outrageous prank; the tragicomic repercussions lead him through a maze of addiction, delusion, paranoia — and ultimately, transcendence.

Virtually abandoned by her family, the indomitable Marjorie Herlihy — mother, widow, and dreamer — falls prey to a confidence scheme dizzying in its sadism and complexity. And unbeknownst to Marj and her children, the father who disappeared decades ago is alive and well nearby, recently in the local news for reasons that will prove to be both his redemption and his undoing. Spiraling toward catastrophe, separate lives collide as family members make a valiant attempt to reunite and create an enduring legacy. To rewrite a ruined American dream.